THE HUB FOR THE STUDY OF HYBRID COMMUNICATION IN PEACEBUILDING (HCPB)

Read about our most recent event: Image and Peace – Photography (3 May)

On 3rd May, the Hub was pleased to host a presentation by its own members Dr Frank Moller and Dr Rasmus Bellmer. Frank and Rasmus were joined by Dr Tiffany Fairey (KCL) and Ana-Catarina Pinho (NFS/USW) to discuss the core role of photography and its relationship to...

The role of documentary in post-civil war peacebuilding: Peace Hut

  by Wenwen Zheng, JNL61004, MA International Public and Political Communication, University of Sheffield. Liberia has suffered two civil wars, each with significant losses. During the first civil war, over half of Liberians became refugees and approximately...

Check out the write ups of our March Hub events!

  Organising Politically Salient Visual Disinformation On 23rd March, Kristina Hook (Kennesaw State), Walter Scheirer, Ernesto Verdeja and Tim Weninger (Notre Dame) addressed Hub members on the topic of “Organising Politically Salient Visual...

No Man’s Land : Peaceful Inspiration from War Film

  by Meiling Tang, JNL61004, MA International Public and Political Communication, University of Sheffield (UK) This blog post will discuss how No Man’s Land, a film, can help build peace. No Man’s Land, a film produced in 2001, is set against the backdrop of the...

TV’s Role in Communicative Peacebuilding: Hugo Blick’s Netflix/BBC Production, Black Earth Rising (Contains spoilers)

  By Tom Butt, JNL61004, MA International Public and Political Communication, University of Sheffield (UK). The TV drama Black Earth Rising (BER) portrays the effects of civil war on Rwandans to encourage peacebuilding in the present day. Set two decades after...

Women on the walls in Belfast: murals and representations of women in conflict

By Marie Migeon, University of Basel Introduction In Belfast, political debate has been taking place through visual representations and especially through murals since the 1980s (Jarman 1998; Rolston 2003). They fulfil a variety of roles, spreading political claims in...

Theatre and Peacebuilding: The analysis of the role of the play Payanihal in peacebuilding

By Yifan Zhang, JNL61004, MA International Public and political Communication, Univeristy of Sheffield. Introduction Theatre is a politically and civilly relevant form of art especially in peacebuilding. It is known to be able to impact audiences and generate positive...

Peacebuilding Initiative or Tourist Trap? Graffiti in Medellín, Colombia

By Elsey Richards, JNL61004, MA International Public and Political Communication, University of Sheffield. Introduction Graffiti is a creative and inclusive strategy for peacebuilding. However, there is a risk that it may become commercialised and too focused on...

The power of a storytelling: How the radio soap opera “Story Story” contributes to peacebuilding efforts in Nigeria

By Stephanie Lam. JNL61004, MA International and Public Communication, University of Sheffield. Introduction People have the opportunity to hear new ideas and information from one another through storytelling. For the citizens of Nigeria, a country located in the...

“We Cannot Undo the Past, But We Can Change the Future”, the Fighters for Peace Project in Post-War Lebanon

By Niamh Woodmass, JNL61004, MA International Public and Political Communication, University of Sheffield Introduction In post-war Lebanon, societal divides between the former enemies remain prominent. The civil war occurred from 13 April 1975 to 13 October 1990 and...

Our Hub and its members are concerned with peaceful cooperation in emerging and established civil societies across the world and the role that communication can play in the achievement of such peaceful cooperation. Accordingly, we examine how communication can contribute to the building and strengthening of peaceful cooperation as well as to repairing fragmented and polarised civil societies, both theoretically and practically.

The Hub endorses a multi-disciplinary approach to and understanding of peacebuilding and understands communication as spanning unmediated communication such as dialogue and debate, the factual and fictional mass media, as well as the visual and the performative arts. It is this that we call hybrid communication.

Our members who come from both the University and the non-University sectors aim to closely collaborate in the implementation of communicative activities geared towards peace. 

OUR MISSION STATEMENT
We aim to study and understand the communicative conditions for peaceful cooperation within civil societies.
We understand the achievement of peaceful cooperation to be relevant to all types of civil societies (emerging, mature) in a variety of political contexts.
We understand the communicative spectrum of civil society to span unmediated communication such as dialogue and debate, the factual and fictional mass media as well as the visual and the performative arts. In short, hybrid communication.
We explore the role of hybrid communication practices, mediated identities, memories and perceptions in the construction and disruption of peaceful cooperation both past and present. 

HOW WE UNDERSTAND COMMUNICATION

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